Category Archives: Buy/ Sell

Franchise Business Consultant Service 2

A franchise is a continuing relationship between a franchisor and a franchisee in which the franchisor’s knowledge, image, success, manufacturing, and marketing techniques are supplied to the franchisee for a consideration. This consideration usually consists of a high “up-front” fee, and a significant royalty percentage, which generally require a fairly long time to recover.

Here are some statistics about the industry (http://www.azfranchises.com/quick-franchise-facts/):

• There are an estimated 3,000 different franchisers across 300 business categories in the U.S. which provide nearly 18 million jobs and generate over $2.1 trillion to the economy.

• Franchises account for 10.5 percent of businesses with paid employees; almost 4% of all small businesses in the USA are franchises.
• It is estimated that the franchise industry accounts for approximately 50% of all retail sales in the US.

• The average initial franchise investment is $250,000- excluding real estate; the average royalty fees paid by franchisees range from 3% to 6% of monthly gross sales.

Franchising offers those who lack business experience (but do not lack capital) a business with a good probability of success. It is a ready-made business, with all the incentives of a small business combined with the management skills of a large one. It is a way to be “in business for yourself, not by yourself.”

Franchises take many forms. Some are simply trade-name licensing arrangements, such as TrueValue Hardware, where the franchisee is provided product access and participation in an advertising cooperative. Some trade name licenses, particularly in skin-care products, are part of a multi-level marketing system, where a franchisee can designate sub-franchisees and benefit from their efforts.

Others might be distributorships, or manufacturer’s representative arrangements, such as automobile dealerships, or gasoline stations. It could be Jane’s Cadillac, or Fred’s Texaco; the product is supplied by the franchisor, but the franchisee has a fair amount of latitude in how the business is located, designed and run. The franchisor will frequently specify showroom requirements and inventory level criteria, and could grant either exclusive or non-exclusive franchise areas.

The most familiar type of franchise, however, is probably the “total concept” store such as McDonald’s. Pay your franchise fee, and they will “roll out” a store for you to operate.

The advantages can be considerable. The franchise fee buys instant product recognition built and maintained by sophisticated advertising and marketing programs. The franchisor’s management experience and depth assists the franchisee by providing employee guidelines, policies and procedures, operating experience, and sometimes even financial assistance. They provide proven methods for determining promising locations, and a successful store design and equipment configuration. Centralized purchasing gives large-buyer “clout” to each location.

The large initial cost can be difficult to raise. The highly structured environment can be more limiting than it is reassuring. Continuing royalty costs take a significant portion of profits. You may wish to use a franchise business consulting service. Several small business periodicals evaluate and rank franchise opportunities. There are now several franchise “matchmaking” firms who can assist in the evaluation process.

How do you choose among all the available franchises? Does it complement your interests? Even if you hire someone to manage the business, expect to spend a lot of time with the operation. Is the name well known? If not, what are you paying for? Is the fee structure reasonable, and all costs clearly described?

Is the franchisor professional? Evaluate them on the clarity of the agreement, and how well your rights are protected, the strength of their training and support program, and their commitment to your success. Be sure to talk to current franchisees about their experiences. Beware of a franchisor committed to a rate of growth that exceeds their ability to manage; they may not be sufficiently interested in the sales they have already made.

Is a franchise a sure path to instant riches? Is it the only hope for independent firms in today’s market? Can Jerry’s Quick Oil Change compete with SpeeDee? Does the franchise deliver business that we might not have gotten anyway? Is it really entrepreneurship; did I go into business or did my money?

This is excerpted from “8 Steps to Starting a Business.” See https://www.jbv.com/8Steps

Franchise Business Consultant Service 1

Franchising provides a way for franchisors to grow their businesses more quickly than they could on their own. For franchisees, it reduces the probability of failure. Substantial personal resources are required to pay the franchise fee and all the other costs associated with start-up. The franchisor may or may not provide assistance with financing.

Often entrepreneurs engage a franchise business consultant to help evaluate and select the best fit to the buyer. Franchise models, investment, and requirements vary widely, so it is imperative that the potential franchisee conduct thorough due diligence before proceeding.

Franchising provides the entrepreneur with an opportunity to enter the world of small business without all the risks usually associated with starting a business from scratch. In most cases, the costs of entering a franchise are less than the costs of buying an existing business. If dealing with a reputable franchisor, buying a franchise represents the acquisition of a proven business model, thus reducing the odds of failure considerably. Franchises are big business. Franchises are very important to commerce accounting for 45% of retail sales, or $1.55 trillion in total revenue in 2010, according to American small business counselors at SCORE. One in 12 businesses is a franchise, across 75 industries and numerous subfields among them. Just a few of the well-known franchises are Krispy Kreme, Burger King, McDonald’s, Taco Bell, Baskin Robbins, Ben & Jerry’s, The Body Shop, and Motel 6.

Franchises exist worldwide. The European Franchise Federation estimates that 8500 distinct franchise brands are operating in the European Union, compared to about 2500 U.S. brands (2009). The franchise industry is particularly strong in the United Kingdom, with the number of franchise units increasing by 44% over the last decade. Franchising accounts for 10.8 billion annually in sales. The personality type of the successful franchisee is that of a person somewhere between an entrepreneur and an employee. The hard work and drive associated with the entrepreneur are still needed for a successful franchise, but the typical franchisee neither needs, nor typically has, the vision and constant pursuit of new ideas that are typical of most entrepreneurs.

Excerpted from “Raising Entrepreneurial Capital,” by Vinturella and Erickson.

Business Valuation Service Industry

If you are considering buying or selling a service industry business you need to start with an evaluation. This can be very complex and the use of a consultant can often give you a value that you can easily defend. The following article outlines the process, and is extracted from FBB Group Ltd: https://www.fbb.com/company-information/recentarticles/how-to-value-a-service-business.

Business Valuation Service Industry

Service businesses run the gamut, from accounting firms, to drycleaners, to janitorial services, engineering, public relations firms, and many other options. Despite their disparity, they all have one thing in common: offering a service to clients.

By their nature, service businesses don’t have much in the way of tangible assets, making EBITDA (Earnings Before Interest, Taxes, Depreciation, and Amortization), for larger businesses, or SDE (Seller’s Discretionary Earnings), for smaller businesses, multiples typically lower than manufacturing businesses. Generally, the smaller the service business, the lower the SDE multiple.

Valuing a service business involves many factors – a tidy, one-size-fits-all formula doesn’t exist. That being said, sellers should recognize that buyers will be particularly interested in certain characteristics for most service businesses.

Normally, valuation is based on several criteria, including: history of profitability, cash flow, overhead, intellectual property, company reputation, number of years in business, opportunities for further growth and added profits, stability of key employees/management team, and customer diversification.

Further consideration goes to whether the company can add more services. Value increases when a service business offers something unique, especially in a growing industry or market. These industries include rapidly growing service sectors, such as: internet/web-based or cloud-computing services and information technology. Relocatable, internet-based businesses with low overhead are particularly attractive due to scalability. Also, the ability for a business to be operated from anywhere increases the number of prospective purchasers – which increases the business value due to higher demand.

In addition, companies with a large recurring monthly revenue stream (for example, when a high percentage of clients are signed up for automatic bill pay each month) will command more value. Examples include alarm companies or website/email-hosting companies that have monthly auto bill pay from clients. Such a consistent revenue stream impresses both buyers and lenders alike.

Other crucial areas for valuation include intellectual property, ongoing relationships with clients, and having a good team in place – ensuring the company will retain its competitive edge, even when the seller (who typically drives new and repeat business) leaves.
Without significant capital assets, key customers and employees are critical. A strong management team adds to the value of a service business (often more so than in manufacturing) and, conversely, it can detract from value when there’s a poor or inexperienced team.
Another measure of value may include the amount of market share. Companies that provide a niche service and don’t have much, if any, competition will command higher multiples of value.

Within the industry, B2B (business-to-business) companies generally command more value than B2C (business-to-consumer). For both, however, client-base diversity commands value – more medium- or small-sized clients being preferable to a few large clients. With low customer concentration, financial risk is reduced. If one client, for instance, cancels a contract or goes out of business, the service business remains financially viable.

Although contrary to an owner’s instinct, businesses command higher value when they’re not dependent on the owner’s personal relationship with clients. If the owner generates a substantial amount of revenue versus the other employees in total, the business could be at risk after the sale. Service businesses are more valuable when customer relationships are readily transferrable: as customers of a drinking-water delivery or HVAC service business don’t usually care who the company’s owner is, for example. Also, keep in mind that seasonal businesses, due to their cyclical nature, have lower value.

Cash flow is “king,” so the primary consideration for bankers is a buyer’s ability to stay current on loans for acquisitions and working capital. Banks focus heavily on reliable cash flow for service businesses, given that there is little, to no, collateral within the service business itself.

Whether you’re in the market to buy or sell, understanding the various considerations of valuation for a service business will make the process smoother and increase the probability of a more successful transaction.

John B. Vinturella, Ph.D. has over 40 years’ experience as a management and strategic consultant, entrepreneur, and college professor. He is a principal in the business opportunity site jbv.com and its associated blog. John recently released his latest book, “8 Steps to Starting a Business,” available on Amazon.